Category Archives: Blog

Detecting and Monitoring Thyroid Cancer: One Dog Steps Up

Written by Cristina Pelin, Lance Murphy, Edward Ko On March 6th, 2015, researchers at the University of Arkansas presented the findings of a recent study aimed at detecting thyroid cancer at the annual Endocrine Society meeting, ENDO. The research tool used? A German Shepherd named Frankie. Frankie, previously a search and rescue dog, was trained […]

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The Science Behind the Dress

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By: Laura Jao, John Long and Brooke Bernardin Recently, social media was overtaken by a heated debate over the color of the dress shown to the right. Is the dress gold and white or blue and black? No matter how sure anyone is of its color, there is always someone who feels just as strongly […]

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Raindrops and How they Break the Laws of Physics

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Written by Christine Liu, Dio Dipre, and Kris Harris The physics of raindrops for the most part are well understood, however there are times at which raindrops fall faster than what their theoretical speed limits are calculated to be. In essence there are raindrops that fall faster than what should be possible for there size even […]

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Finding Love in the Animal Kingdom

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Written by: Sarah Berlinger, Edwin Vargas, and Georgiana Yang Valentine’s Day has come and gone: a day that leaves everyone extremely aware of their current relationship status. The choice to “mate” or not is a conscious decision for humans that varies from person to person. On the other hand, specific animal species collectively make similar decisions. […]

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Scientists have Discovered a Type of Sea Slug that can Photosynthesize

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Written by Tanay Bhandarkar, ShaSha Lee, and Hyunwook Lee Recently, scientists discovered that certain  sea slugs can take genes from the algae it eats. These genes include the gene linked to photosynthesis, a chemical process usually associated with plants. However, it seems that the sea slug is using photosynthesis to “feed”, despite that fact that […]

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Biobatteries: Sugar-powered Batteries

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  As all parents know, children receive a sugar high following excessive consumption of candy. Sugar is a great source of energy that has been harnessed by all respiring organisms that convert glucose into ATP, or energy. Why is sugar such a great source of energy? For organisms, sugar molecules are dense in energy yet easy to digest and transport […]

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Discovery Spotlight: New Form of Energy Storage in “Crumpled” Graphene

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            When you have a bad idea, you typically crumple up the piece of paper you wrote it on and throw it in the trash. However, researchers at MIT have taken the simple idea of crumpling paper and have applied it to a whole other level that could revolutionize electrical energy […]

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The Science Behind Skipping Stones

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Ever wondered about the physics of skipping stones?   Well, it was first described in 1968 by Kirston Koths, a chemistry student at Amherst College. “Koths photographed stones skipping across a sandbox, a tabletop covered in a blanket, and water. On the sand and the tabletop, he found, the stones struck with their trailing edge, […]

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Science + Sugar = Candy!

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Boo! Trick or Treat! In honor of Halloween and because we love science and candy, we have decided to write about the science behind some of our favorite candies. Licorice Vs.   => ANISE LICORICE ROOT CANDY   What gives liquorice candy (aka Twizzlers, Red Vines, etc.) its taste? At first, this may seem like a […]

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How to Secure a Research Position

Thursday, October 16th, SEBS hosted a research panel to help undergraduates learn more about the world of research – how to find and secure positions, and what to expect. Six panelists spoke about their experiences: Becca Arbacher (CC’16, Physics), Sarah Berlinger (SEAS ’16, Chemical Engineering), Vahe Galstyan (CC’16, Physics), Madeleine Hunter (CC’17, Economics, premed), Brian […]

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